Mixed-Up Words


Did you konw you’re a guiens? Jsut the fcat taht you can atllacuy raed tihs psot porves taht fcat. The huamn mnid is so pufowerl it can dcodee tihs txet eevn tguohh eervy sglnie wrod is slepled iocenrtclry. The one cavaet is taht the frist and lsat lertets are pervresed in erevy wrod. Cidrgbame Uitesirnvy cetoudncd a sduty and fnuod taht the biarn deos not raed eevry snlige lteetr, but wodrs as a wohle.

Reading mixed up words is quite as magical as it may seem. After doing a bit of research I found that the Cambridge study wasn’t totally accurate. There are many factors that allow you to be able to read the above paragraph. 27 of 74 words above have not been scrambled because they are 1, 2, or 3 letter words. This helps to maintain the grammatical structure of the sentence. 20 of the 74 words are four letter which means that only two letters have been transposed. Its very simple for a person to decode a 4 letter words. Basically this means that 63% of this sentence is not even scrambled. 15 of the words are 5-6 letters long which are only moderately difficult to decode. This leaves 20% of the words in the above paragraph which are difficult to unscramble. Also when words are in context they’re much easier to figure out what word goes there based on the letters available.

There are several words that have permutations that are much more difficult to decode. For instance if you group all the consonants together and leaving the vowels grouped together makes it much more difficult. I have to admit it’s pretty impressive that you can read mixed up words or scrambled letters even if only 20% of the words are hard to decode but not quite as impressive as I first thought. If you’re interested in scrambling up your own words visit the Word Scrambler.

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