Knitting the First Row

So you’ve learned how to make a slip knot and how to cast on and now you’re ready to really begin knitting. Hopefully some of your knitting anxiety has subsided and you’re feeling confident enough to begin the next step: Knitting that first row. While it may seem strange at first, knitting the first row is the next step toward gaining confidence and becoming a knitting pro. I recommend practicing these first couple of steps several times before moving on. It’ll help you get the hang of it and you’ll undoubtedly feel more prepared to journey on toward your next knitting project, turning knitting into one of your ultimate hobbies.

And so, without further delay, we bring you:

Knitting the First Row

Step 1: Hold the needle with the stitches (we’ll call it the “stitches needle”) in your left hand and put the point of the right needle through the first stitch, from front to back. (Sound familiar? Yes, it should. It’s just like in casting on)

Step 2: Bring yarn from the ball over the point of your right needle and bring the stitch through with the right needle point (this should also be familiar).

Step 3: This is where you transfer the stitch from the “stitches needle” in your left hand to the right handed needle. Just slip the loop off the “stitches needle” and the new stitch will be on the right hand needle.

Step 4: Repeat steps 1-3 until you get your desired width.

(If you don’t feel entirely comfortable with this process, don’t be afraid to start over and try again, several times if needed, before moving on to step 5)

Step 5: When you have your desired width, transfer the right needle into your left hand. Work the right hand needle through back through the stitches (using steps 1-3) until the row is completed.

Step 6: Repeat this process using the needle in your left hand, until the block is completed.

Congratulations! You’ve completed your first row. The next article will cover “binding off,” which is a necessary part of knitting the first row. But first, you may want to practice casting on and knitting the first row several times, paying attention to tension and width, and to ensure that you’re comfortable enough to move on with your first knitting project.

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